Andrew Cassel and Dan Rottenberg

Pushing the Right Buttons
An email conversation about the news of the day.
March 8 2001 1:49 PM

Andrew Cassel and Dan Rottenberg

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Uh, Dan, did you forget your medication this morning?

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Knowing what a truly reasonable, enlightened fellow you really are, I can only ascribe this little rant to a temporary chemical imbalance, or else a late winter case of cabin fever. So here's what I suggest. Knock off early today. Visit the Flower Show. Stand next to some of those exquisite displays of exotic flora and breathe deeply.

Before you leave our readers with the impression that I'm the Mr. Rogers of Broad St., by the way, let me note for the record that I enjoy a good rant as well as the next guy. You just didn't push the right buttons: local public broadcasting, for instance, or State Sen. Vince Fumo. Topics like the Palestinians move me to tears rather than rage--a reaction that I'm sure would be different if I lived in Netanya or Jerusalem.

As for leaders being clueless, that's an easy notion to buy, especially after living in Philadelphia for 16 years. If the likes of Frank Rizzo and Wilson Goode can rise to the top here, why should we expect any better of people in the rest of the world? The fact is, what's sometimes said of the Jews is also true of Philadelphia--it's just like everyplace else, only more so.

Hey, it's been real. Seems a little more like standup improv than journalism, but fun nevertheless. Catch you on Camac Street one of these days. ...

All the best,
Andy

Andrew Cassel writes a thrice-weekly column about the economy. He has been a columnist, business reporter, and national correspondent for thePhiladelphia Inquirersince 1984. Philadelphia journalist Dan Rottenberg is a veteran of 16 years with alternative publications and the author of seven books, most recentlyThe Inheritor's Handbook. He currently editsFamily Businessmagazine.

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