The Shape of Mud-Slinging To Come

George Kelling and Ester Fuchs

The Shape of Mud-Slinging To Come

George Kelling and Ester Fuchs

The Shape of Mud-Slinging To Come
An email conversation about the news of the day.
Sept. 30 1999 5:48 PM

George Kelling and Ester Fuchs

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Dear George,

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It seems that everywhere I go people want talk about the Brooklyn Museum, freedom of speech, art, religion, and, of course, the mayor. So try as I might to interest friends and family in Charter revision, I'm afraid budgets, bureaucratic reorganization, and mayoral succession just can't compete with larger-than-life egotistic personalities, the war of the righteous, and raunchy art. It makes me wonder how Hillary Clinton will conduct her campaign for Senate against the mayor. He's already baited her on being "anti-Catholic" for not opposing the exhibit. One thing for sure, the press is going to have fun. The New York Post has already told its readers that she's "dissing" the city by choosing to spend New Year's Eve in Washington, where as first lady she'll host the national celebration. Do you think we will actually get any attention paid to issues in this Senate race?

The Manhattan Institute Forum sounds a bit like the high-and-mighty intellectuals lamenting their loss of authority over the masses. I must admit that I am only rarely invited to their events. Apparently, my questions at past forums have been too "pointed" for their guest speakers.

If there is a biological drive toward order among humans, I have yet to see it appear among my three children! And while I am a religious person, I don't trust the leadership in our religious institutions to set the moral standards for the rest of us. Politics and religion have become too intricately intertwined.

Believe it or not, I'm going to give a talk to the Women's City Club on "NYC: The End of the Liberal Experiment?" Now what do I mean by that title? It's surely a topic for another day. It's been great meeting you over the Breakfast Table. Take care.

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Warmest regards,
Ester

George Kelling teaches at Rutgers and Harvard and is a fellow at the Manhattan Institute. He and his wife, Catherine M. Coles, are co-authors of Fixing Broken Windows: Restoring Order and Reducing Crime in Our Communities. (Clickhereto buy the book.) Ester Fuchs is director of the Center for Urban Research and Policy at Columbia University and teaches at Barnard College. She is currently editing New York City: The End of the Liberal Experiment.