Rich Man, Famous Man

Fareed Zakaria and Paula Throckmorton Zakaria

Rich Man, Famous Man

Fareed Zakaria and Paula Throckmorton Zakaria

Rich Man, Famous Man
An email conversation about the news of the day.
May 4 1999 12:18 PM

Fareed Zakaria and Paula Throckmorton Zakaria

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Dear Fareed:

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If you had looked at the New York Post, you would have found a photograph of Richard Gere touring a refugee camp in Macedonia. Nothing in the text about Richard Gere. I assume that he is there helping the Kosovars gain independence in the hope that his efforts will someday translate into freedom for his fellow Buddhists, the Tibetans. This is how it works in Hollywood--you star in my movie, I'll be in yours.

By the way, movie stars are no longer considered rich and famous--just famous. My bible, the New York Post, tells that leading businesspeople are much better paid than their entertainment counterparts. Michael Eisner made nearly $600 million last year, while the highest paid entertainer, Jerry Seinfeld, pulled in a paltry $267 million. Poor Jerry.

And you missed the article about Dan Rather's television interview with Milosevic's wife, Mirjana Markovic. In case you were wondering, her husband, "doesn't hate any people. He does not use violence. You can believe that." If only Barbara Walters had been around to ask her some tough questions!

What news from the Financial Times?

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Paula

Fareed Zakaria, Slate's wine columnist, is also managing editor of Foreign Affairs and a contributing editor of Newsweek. Paula Throckmorton Zakaria designs jewelry and writes occassionally for the Wall Street Journal and other publications. She was president and publisher of The Black Book, a photography journal and sourcebook based in New York.