Still Avoiding

Lasky and Lavin

Still Avoiding

Lasky and Lavin

Still Avoiding
An email conversation about the news of the day.
Jan. 7 1999 6:02 PM

Lasky and Lavin

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Julie,

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I want the Trial to go away. You want the Trial to go away. Apparently mostAmericans want the Trial to go away. Clinton definitely wants the Trial togo away.

Nothing much we can do about it. Except vent frustration and createdistraction. I felt I'd made a bold move in floating the idea of Chicagofashion as a distraction. But it turns out there are those in Washingtonfeeling even bolder. Desperately seeking proposals that makehis administration look good and have bipartisan appeal, Clinton recentlyurged a modest tax cut for disabled and long-term ill Americans and theircaretakers (Times columnist Michael Weinstein today says fine but the cutwould be small and it wouldn't help poor people.)

Today the Times reports in another piece that the Clinton administration is seeking "a $400 million increasein financing for afterschool and summer school programs to tutor strugglingstudents and to keep children of working parents off the streets afterschool hours." I don't know how farthis would go to fill the gap in funding afterschool programs overall, butthe claim is that this money would serve 1.1 million children. And ofcourse their parents. Sounds good to me.

I'm all for keeping those distractions coming. Maybe one or two of the moreneeded will even, at some point, turn from distraction into reality.

Until tomorrow, Maud

p.s. Now, we have to get computers specially outfitted not only for theyear 2000, but also the euro glyph? Yikes.

Julie Lasky is editor in chief of Interiors magazine and a contributing editor to Brill's Content. Maud Lavin is author of the forthcoming book Generation Yes: Gambling on the Financial Futures of Women Under 35.