So Long, Alphonse

Graham and Wasserstein

So Long, Alphonse

Graham and Wasserstein

So Long, Alphonse
An email conversation about the news of the day.
Nov. 6 1998 8:37 PM

Graham and Wasserstein

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Dearest Stephen,

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I too feel far too well informed. I am happy to say that what I've learned from this week is that I also prefer Terrence Rattigan to John Osborne. A feeling I think we both share with all the Slate readers including the esteemed editor. I am very much in favor of your Dots. I remain quite pleased that Alphonse D'Amato is no longer my senator. I was also quite pleased to see tin soldiers caroling in front of Radio City on my way home tonight. Therefore you can believe everything you read in the papers, especially the New York Times preview of The Great Radio City Spectacular.

And most of all I firmly believe that you make a great deal more sense out of the news than I do. Just ask anyone at Lucent Industries and they will tell you. Stephen, I feel we must do more instant election analysis next year. Especially if anything else happens with Senora Gucci's psychic. It's been a pleasure. I'm only sorry we didn't get to spend more time on the Sino-Soviet rift. But perhaps Pat Conroy will do a sequel.

See you at Gwen's wedding. Couldn't help but name drop one last time. Who's Gwen's? And why is she getting married on a Friday? That's the question I leave you and our readers with. But I wish you and Gwen all happiness. And of course I wish the same for my new idol the governor of Minnesota from the great state of Hubert Humphrey.

xxxxxxxxxx with every dot imaginable Wendy.

Stephen Graham lives in New York City, where he is pursuing a doctorate in English literature. He is co-publisher of Ecco Press and a contributing editor at Grand Street. Wendy Wasserstein, a playwright, is author of An American Daughter, The Heidi Chronicles, The Sisters Rosensweig, and others.