History of Jim crow and the Civil Rights Act of 1875, in Episode 3 of Reconstruction.

The Original Civil Rights Movement, and How White America Blocked It

The Original Civil Rights Movement, and How White America Blocked It

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Nov. 30 2017 3:32 PM
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The Roots of Jim Crow

How the Supreme Court failed to protect Black Americans’ hard-won rights of citizenship during Reconstruction.

Atlanta, Georgia shortly after the end of the American Civil War showing the city's railroad roundhouse in ruins.
Atlanta shortly after the end of the Civil War.

Photo illustration by Slate. Photo by George N. Barnard/Wikipedia.

To learn more about this members-only podcast series, visit Slate.com/Reconstruction.

In Episode 3 of Reconstruction: A Slate Academy, Rebecca Onion and Jamelle Bouie explore the legacy of the Civil Rights Act of 1875. They talk about how the idea of American citizenship changed after the end of slavery, when freed people tried to assert their hard-won rights and white people sought to re-establish a caste system based on race. Their guest is Aderson François, a professor of law at Georgetown and director of the Institute for Public Representation’s civil rights law clinic.

Have a question about the series? Join Jamelle and Rebecca for a live chat in the Slate Plus Facebook group at noon EST on Monday.