Building a better bike in Brooklyn.

FT
Stories from the Financial Times. 
May 29 2011 1:07 AM

The Case for Working With Your Hands

Joe Nocella designs buildings by day and bikes by night.

(Continued from Page 1)

As with architecture, the first step for Nocella is to suss out his clients' desires. Like many, I wasn't quite sure what these were. But as we talked, it emerged I was looking for something distinct from the procession of overly technical-looking mountain bikes and sturdily sober city commuters that my cycling life had become. Nor was I particularly fond of swoopy carbon-fibre road bikes. Budget was an issue. And then it hit me: what I was looking for – in the bike, if not in life itself – was a return to the graceful, lugged-steel frame simplicity of a Panasonic 10-speed road bike I had owned in the 1980s.

From here, it's a series of questions: modern or vintage frame? New components or hunt for the rather paradoxical "new old stock" – vintage gear in unopened original boxes? Index or friction shifters? Geared, fixed-gear or single-speed? About 70 per cent of Nocella's business, it turns out, is so-called "fixies", bikes without gears (or often brakes), a style increasingly à la mode in relatively flat New York. "They're cheaper, they're lighter, there's less maintenance," says Nocella. "I have people coming to me and saying, I have all these gears and I don't even shift anymore." Yet with decades of gear-shifting built into my muscle memory, I wasn't quite ready to quit.

The frame hunt was on. One of the virtues of well-built steel frames is that they're virtually indestructible. Which means eBay and garage sales are awash in decades' worth of good frames, often at a fraction of their original cost. After losing at the last minute on a beautiful red Masi frame, Nocella pointed me to a dark grey "Designer '84" frame by another Italian company, Ciöcc, founded by the legendary Giovanni Pelizzoli. It had signs of use but looked dark, strong and sculptural. I won it for the eminently reasonable price of $300.

Advertisement

I faced another choice: repaint or leave as is? This is debated in internet forums with theological zeal. I went for patina, which lowered costs and gave me a bike that was largely new, but looked as if I could have had it forever. Then, days of agonising over parts, from bottom brackets to bottle cages. Next came the wheel build. This is where art and engineering come together, as Nocella and I lace the spokes in a "three-cross" configuration. "The simplest spoking pattern you can do is radial, like a wagon wheel," Nocella tells me. "But you can only do that on the front wheel." The back wheel not only bears more weight, but gets torque pressure from the chain – here Nocella, waving Gerd Schraner's tome The Art of Wheelbuilding, launches into a physics seminar. Like a bridge, the suspension needs to be perfectly tuned: if one spoke is off, it will subtly degrade its neighbours, working itself into a wobble.

A few days later, the bike comes together before my eyes. It hasn't been without its hiccups – the Campagnola chain required its own special (and expensive) tool, slightly but crucially different from the other (expensive) Campagnola chain tool Nocella already owned. Remarkably, however, the new gear, despite various changes in technology, fits perfectly on this more than 30-year-old frame (that little tab to hold the rear derailleur is still exactly where it needs to be), which speaks to the enduring sort of perfection of bicycle design itself.

"I'm an architect, and that job could go away tomorrow, they could outsource it to India," he says. "There's nothing I do at that place that's unique. What I do here, you can't replicate it – no one else has these bikes, nor will they ever." Feeling a bit flush with the aura of this work of art in the age of mechanical reproduction, I hop on the bike, something greater than the sum of its parts, and ride home.

This article originally appeared in Financial Times. Click here to read more coverage from the Weekend FT.

Tom Vanderbilt is author of Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do, now available in paperback. He is contributing editor to Artforum, Print, and I.D.; contributing writer to Design Observer; and has written for many publications, including Wired, the Wilson Quarterly, the New York Times Magazine, and the London Review of Books. He blogs at howwedrive.com and lives in Brooklyn, N.Y. You can follow him on Twitter at www.twitter.com/tomvanderbilt.

TODAY IN SLATE

The Slatest

Ben Bradlee Dead at 93

The legendary Washington Post editor presided over the paper’s Watergate coverage.

The Congressional Republican Digging Through Scientists’ Grant Proposals

Renée Zellweger’s New Face Is Too Real

Sleater-Kinney Was Once America’s Best Rock Band

Can it be again?

Whole Foods Is Desperate for Customers to Feel Warm and Fuzzy Again

The XX Factor

I’m 25. I Have $250.03.

My doctors want me to freeze my eggs.

The XX Factor
Oct. 20 2014 6:17 PM I’m 25. I Have $250.03. My doctors want me to freeze my eggs.
Technocracy

Forget Oculus Rift

This $25 cardboard box turns your phone into an incredibly fun virtual reality experience.

George Tiller’s Murderer Threatens Another Abortion Provider, Claims Free Speech

Walmart Is Crushing the Rest of Corporate America in Adopting Solar Power

  News & Politics
The World
Oct. 21 2014 3:13 PM Why Countries Make Human Rights Pledges They Have No Intention of Honoring
  Business
Moneybox
Oct. 21 2014 5:57 PM Soda and Fries Have Lost Their Charm for Both Consumers and Investors
  Life
The Vault
Oct. 21 2014 2:23 PM A Data-Packed Map of American Immigration in 1903
  Double X
The XX Factor
Oct. 21 2014 3:03 PM Renée Zellweger’s New Face Is Too Real
  Slate Plus
Behind the Scenes
Oct. 21 2014 1:02 PM Where Are Slate Plus Members From? This Weird Cartogram Explains. A weird-looking cartogram of Slate Plus memberships by state.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Oct. 21 2014 1:47 PM The Best Way to Fry an Egg
  Technology
Technology
Oct. 21 2014 5:38 PM Justified Paranoia Citizenfour offers a look into the mind of Edward Snowden.
  Health & Science
Climate Desk
Oct. 21 2014 11:53 AM Taking Research for Granted Texas Republican Lamar Smith continues his crusade against independence in science.
  Sports
Sports Nut
Oct. 20 2014 5:09 PM Keepaway, on Three. Ready—Break! On his record-breaking touchdown pass, Peyton Manning couldn’t even leave the celebration to chance.