Gym etiquette, fitness magazines and DVDs, face exercises: The Fitness Issue.

The business, culture, and science of working out.
Jan. 20 2011 10:23 AM

The Fitness Issue

Slate writers on the business, culture, and science of working out.

Illustration by Robert Neubecker. Click image to expand.

"Gym Rats and Dope Fiends: Exercise can help reduce drug cravings. But is exercise itself a kind of drug?" by Daniel Engber. Posted Friday, Jan. 21, 2011.

"Now, Hold That Squat. And Smile!: The strange life of the fitness model," by Josh Levin. Posted Friday, Jan. 21, 2011.

"Kafka's Calisthenics: Watch and learn the favorite exercise routine of early 20th century Europeans," by Sarah Wildman. Posted Friday, Jan. 21, 2011.

"How the Soloflex Changed America: The story of a pilot, a shirtless spokesmodel, and a transformational home-fitness device," by Justin Peters. Posted Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011.

"Work Out So Hard You Vomit: The rise of P90X, CrossFit, and the 'extreme' exercise routine," by Annie Lowrey. Posted Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011.

"Cheeks of Steel: Are face exercises a scam or a fountain of youth?" by Elizabeth Weingarten. Posted Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011.

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"Sweatin' With the Fatties: My endless, fruitless quest for a fat-girl-friendly exercise DVD," by Torrie Bosch. Posted Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011.

"Celebs (and Others) Working Out: A collection of Magnum photographs." Posted Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2011.

"10 Tips for Tighter Buns!: The fitness magazine: where it came from and where it's going," by Troy Patterson. Posted Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2011.

"Fitness for Foreigners: How people exercise in China, Pakistan, Sudan, and Sweden." Posted Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2011.

"Gym Etiquette Flowchart: See someone you know? You're covered with sweat? Don't panic," by Daniel Engber, Josh Levin, Jenny Livengood, and Melonyce McAfee. Posted Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2011.

"Exercise Time Warp: I spent a week with Jack LaLanne, Jane Fonda, and Jillian Michaels. Who's the best fitness guru of them all?" by Emily Yoffe. Posted Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2011.

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