Slate's Mistakes for the Week of Oct. 29, 2012

Slate's mistakes.
Nov. 2 2012 3:15 AM

Corrections

Slate's mistakes.

Red pen

Photograph by Gabriela Insuratelu.

In the Nov. 2 "Coal," the caption of a chart mislabeled coal reserves as being in metric tons rather than millions of metric tons.

In the Nov. 1 “Efficient Planet,” Austin Troy misstated the percentage of Copenhagen households that own a car. It is 29 percent, not 53 percent.

In a Nov. 1 "Faith-Based," a chart of the Mormon hierarchy depicted the general officers for the LDS primary as men. They're women.

In a Nov. 1 "Science," Daniel Engber wrote that animal facilities at Baylor University flooded in 2001. The tragedy occurred at Baylor College of Medicine, a separate institution. In addition, the photo accompanying the article showed rats. The lab animals that died in the storm-surge flood of New York University's Smilow Research Building were mice.

Due to an editing error, the Oct. 31 "Explainer Roundup" misspelled Hillary Clinton's first name.

In an Oct. 31 “Weigel” blog post, David Weigel misstated the number of Ohio poll respondents who think the Obama administration deserves credit for improvements in the economy. It was 63 percent, not 6.

In an Oct. 30 "Politics," David Weigel misspelled George Stephanopoulos' last name and misidentified the Long Beach Press-Telegram as the Los Angeles Press-Telegram.

In an Oct. 30 "Science," Douglas Starr misspelled the first name of criminal anthropologist Cesare Lombroso.

In an Oct. 29 “Moneybox,” Matthew Yglesias misspelled Apple vice president Scott Browett’s name.

In an Oct. 27 “Slatest” blog post, Daniel Politi misidentified Westgate Resorts CEO David A. Siegel as Lee Seigel and misspelled the last name of Lynn Rhinehart of the AFL-CIO.

An Oct. 23 “Trending News Channel” blog post and video mischaracterized a study about sexually explicit images generated by teenagers. The Internet Watch Foundation did not find that 88 percent of risqué self-made images posted online by teens were later shown on “parasite porn” websites. Rather, 88 percent of such teen images on porn websites originated from other sites where teens had self-posted them.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you've seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our comments sections at the bottom of each article.

TODAY IN SLATE

History

Slate Plus Early Read: The Self-Made Man

The story of America’s most pliable, pernicious, irrepressible myth.

Rehtaeh Parsons Was the Most Famous Victim in Canada. Now, Journalists Can’t Even Say Her Name.

Mitt Romney May Be Weighing a 2016 Run. That Would Be a Big Mistake.

Amazing Photos From Hong Kong’s Umbrella Revolution

Transparent Is the Fall’s Only Great New Show

The XX Factor

Rehtaeh Parsons Was the Most Famous Victim in Canada

Now, journalists can't even say her name.

Doublex

Lena Dunham, the Book

More shtick than honesty in Not That Kind of Girl.

What a Juicy New Book About Diane Sawyer and Katie Couric Fails to Tell Us About the TV News Business

Does Your Child Have Sluggish Cognitive Tempo? Or Is That Just a Disorder Made Up to Scare You?

  News & Politics
Foreigners
Sept. 29 2014 10:00 PM “Everything Must Change in Italy” An interview with Italian Prime Minster Matteo Renzi.
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 29 2014 7:01 PM We May Never Know If Larry Ellison Flew a Fighter Jet Under the Golden Gate Bridge
  Life
Dear Prudence
Sept. 29 2014 3:10 PM The Lonely Teetotaler Prudie counsels a letter writer who doesn’t drink alcohol—and is constantly harassed by others for it.
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 29 2014 1:52 PM Do Not Fear California’s New Affirmative Consent Law
  Slate Plus
Slate Fare
Sept. 29 2014 8:45 AM Slate Isn’t Too Liberal, but … What readers said about the magazine’s bias and balance.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 29 2014 9:06 PM Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice Looks Like a Comic Masterpiece
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 29 2014 11:56 PM Innovation Starvation, the Next Generation Humankind has lots of great ideas for the future. We need people to carry them out.
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Sept. 29 2014 12:01 PM This Is Your MOM’s Mars
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 28 2014 8:30 PM NFL Players Die Young. Or Maybe They Live Long Lives. Why it’s so hard to pin down the effects of football on players’ lives.