Slate's Mistakes for the Week of Oct. 29, 2012

Slate's mistakes.
Nov. 2 2012 3:15 AM

Corrections

Slate's mistakes.

Red pen

Photograph by Gabriela Insuratelu.

In the Nov. 2 "Coal," the caption of a chart mislabeled coal reserves as being in metric tons rather than millions of metric tons.

In the Nov. 1 “Efficient Planet,” Austin Troy misstated the percentage of Copenhagen households that own a car. It is 29 percent, not 53 percent.

In a Nov. 1 "Faith-Based," a chart of the Mormon hierarchy depicted the general officers for the LDS primary as men. They're women.

In a Nov. 1 "Science," Daniel Engber wrote that animal facilities at Baylor University flooded in 2001. The tragedy occurred at Baylor College of Medicine, a separate institution. In addition, the photo accompanying the article showed rats. The lab animals that died in the storm-surge flood of New York University's Smilow Research Building were mice.

Due to an editing error, the Oct. 31 "Explainer Roundup" misspelled Hillary Clinton's first name.

In an Oct. 31 “Weigel” blog post, David Weigel misstated the number of Ohio poll respondents who think the Obama administration deserves credit for improvements in the economy. It was 63 percent, not 6.

In an Oct. 30 "Politics," David Weigel misspelled George Stephanopoulos' last name and misidentified the Long Beach Press-Telegram as the Los Angeles Press-Telegram.

In an Oct. 30 "Science," Douglas Starr misspelled the first name of criminal anthropologist Cesare Lombroso.

In an Oct. 29 “Moneybox,” Matthew Yglesias misspelled Apple vice president Scott Browett’s name.

In an Oct. 27 “Slatest” blog post, Daniel Politi misidentified Westgate Resorts CEO David A. Siegel as Lee Seigel and misspelled the last name of Lynn Rhinehart of the AFL-CIO.

An Oct. 23 “Trending News Channel” blog post and video mischaracterized a study about sexually explicit images generated by teenagers. The Internet Watch Foundation did not find that 88 percent of risqué self-made images posted online by teens were later shown on “parasite porn” websites. Rather, 88 percent of such teen images on porn websites originated from other sites where teens had self-posted them.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you've seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our comments sections at the bottom of each article.

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