Slate's Mistakes for the Week of Nov. 12, 2012

Slate's mistakes.
Nov. 16 2012 4:00 AM

Corrections

Slate's mistakes.

Red pen

Photograph by Gabriela Insuratelu.

Due to a copy-editing error, a Nov. 16 "Foreigners" stated that 14,000 rockets have been fired at Israeli towns since January 2009. About 1,400 rockets have been fired at Israeli towns.

In a Nov. 16 “Technology," Aisha Harris stated that hiding stories from your Facebook Timeline would also remove them from your Couples page. That’s not always the case—depending on your privacy setting, those stories could appear on the Couples page.

In a Nov. 15 “Jurisprudence,” Ryan McCartney misidentified Judge Julie Carnes as Judie Carnes.

In a Nov. 15 "Movies," Dana Stevens misspelled Thomas Kinkade's last name.

A headline on a Nov. 15 “Culturebox” stated that three Oscar winners were trying their hands at Edward Ford. They are Oscar nominees.

In a Nov. 15 “Brow Beat” post, Forrest Wickman stated, incorrectly, that Netflix’s House of Cards will air on the BBC in the United Kingdom. In the U.K. it will play on Netflix, not on the BBC.

In a Nov. 14 “History,” Jeff Turrentine used a paraphrase of a Rick Perry quote that read, "Nice country you got there. Be a real shame if something happened to it." That line closely resembles one from a 2009 New Yorker article by Hendrik Hertzberg about Texas' secession movement, which paraphrased the same quotation from Perry. Hertzberg's line read: "Nice little Union you got there. Be a shame if anything happened to it." The author contends the echo was unintentional, but given the context, the article should have avoided the line or cited Hertzberg's article. The passage has been removed.

In a Nov. 14 "XX Factor" post, Amanda Hess incorrectly referred to an io9 blogger as Analee Lewis. Her name is Annalee Newitz. Hess also misspelled the website’s name as i09. It is io9.

In a Nov. 14 “Weigel,” David Weigel misspelled Tulsi Gabbard’s first name.

In a Nov. 13 “Reckoning,” Michael Moran misspelled Jon Huntsman’s first name.

In a Nov. 12 “Moneybox,” Matthew Yglesias misspelled the first names of William Cohan and Eliot Spitzer.

In a Nov. 12 “Slatest,” Josh Voorhees misspelled the name of the technology website Gizmodo.

In a Nov. 12 “View From Chicago,” Richard A. Posner incorrectly stated that a tie occurred in the Electoral College in 1824. Rather, in that year, four candidates got electoral votes, no candidate had a majority, and the winner had to be decided by the House of Representatives. He also misstated the situation in which candidates would have an incentive to seek a recount if the winner were determined by the popular vote. Thanks to Texas State Representative Scott Hochberg and Barnard professor Scott Minkoff for the corrections.

In the Nov. 11 “New Scientist,” Tiffany O’Callaghan gave an outdated academic affiliation for Oliver Sacks. He is a professor at New York University School of Medicine, not Columbia University.

In a Nov. 10 “Politics,” Fred Kaplan wrote that Paula Broadwell joined the light infantry officers' corps upon graduation from West Point. She did not.

In a Nov. 9 “Jurisprudence,” Emily Bazelon misstated the number of House seats allotted for both Pennsylvania and Ohio and how many of those seats Republicans control. In Pennsylvania, Republicans control 13 of 18 seats, not eight of 12. In Ohio, Republicans control 12 of 16 seats, not 14 of 18. She also quoted Nathaniel Persily as saying Democrats and Republicans control a certain number of congressional seats. They control the line-drawing process for those seats.

In a Nov. 7 “Weigel,” David Weigel misstated Pennsylvania's representation in the House. The state has 18 seats, not 13. He also misstated the number of House seats Republicans hold in Ohio. Republicans control 12 seats, not 14.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you've seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our comments sections at the bottom of each article.

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