Slate's Mistakes for the Week of Oct. 1, 2012

Slate's mistakes.
Oct. 5 2012 2:00 AM

Corrections

Slate's mistakes.

Red pen

Photograph by Gabriela Insuratelu.

In an Oct. 5 "Books," Simon Reynolds referred to Alva Noë as a she. He is a he.

Due to an editing error, an Oct. 4 “Future Tense” blog item said that Llewellyn Wood Longstaff gave 25,000 euros to Robert Scott's expeditions. He gave 25,000 pounds.

In an Oct. 4 “Hive” article, Farhad Manjoo originally stated that Kickstarter no longer allows “digital renderings of hardware” in its project pitches. It has actually banned “photorealistic” depictions of hardware.

In an Oct. 3 “Future Tense” blog post, Will Oremus referred to the electric-car battery maker Ener1 as a Department of Energy loan recipient. The money actually came in the form of a grant, as part of the 2009 stimulus bill, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

In an Oct. 3 “Science,” Laura Helmuth wrote that only Fred Hoyle won a Nobel for the work of Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler, and Hoyle. William Fowler was the physicist who won the prize.

In an Oct. 3 “Television,” L.V. Anderson misspelled Fabio Viviani’s last name.

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In an Oct. 3 "XX Factor," Allison Benedikt misspelled Lilly Ledbetter's first name.

In an October 2 “Future Tense” blog post, Will Oremus mistakenly identified an AR-15 pistol as an AR-15 assault rifle in a photo caption.

Due to an editing error, a phrase from an Oct. 2 “Future Tense” article was missing. A court decision in 2010 said that the FCC did not have the power to adopt network neutrality policies.

In an Oct. 2 “Technology” column, Farhad Manjoo originally stated that the new Nest thermostat has one more internal connection slot than the old version. It has two new slots. In addition, the piece said the new Nest works in 95 percent of all homes. It works in 95 percent of homes with low-voltage temperature systems.

In an Oct. 1 “Explainer,” Brian Palmer stated that a woman died after falling from a cliff in Alaska. She survived the fall.

In an Oct. 1 “Technology,” Farhad Manjoo wrote that Doree Shafrir’s BuzzFeed article on nightmares is 6,000 words long. It is more than 7,000 words long.

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