Slate's Mistakes for the Week of July 2, 2012

Slate's mistakes.
July 6 2012 6:30 AM

Corrections

Slate's mistakes.

Red pen

Photograph by Gabriela Insuratelu.

In a July 5 "Jurisprudence," Emily Bazelon misidentified the source of an analysis of front-runners for a Supreme Court nomination if Mitt Romney is elected president. The analysis was by Reuters, not AP.

In a July 5 "Explainer," the letters in the acronym TTYL were originally transposed.

Due to a copy editing error, a July 5 "Science" article misidentified a soldier in the photo caption. The soldier pictured was a command sergeant major, not a major.

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In a July 4 "Photography," Heather Murphy misidentified a Dallas Morning News photographer as a Dallas Times photographer.

In a July 3 "DoubleX," Jennifer Block misspelled Melissa Cheyney's last name.

In a July 2 "Future Tense" blog post on a university research team hacking a drone, David Sydiongco incorrectly stated that the software used is widely available but the hardware is not. The reverse is true: The hardware is easy to come by, while the software is not.

In a July 2 “XX Factor” post, J. Bryan Lowder incorrectly spelled the name of author and cartoonist Tim Kreider.

In a June 29 "Books," Noah Berlatsky misstated the title of Anthony Heilbut’s 1971 book on gospel. It is called The Gospel Sound: Good News and Bad Times, not Good News and Hard Times.

In a June 29 “Movies,” David Haglund referred to Seth MacFarlane as a native of Rhode Island. He was born and raised in Connecticut.

A photo caption in a June 29 “Books” originally dated a photo of Clara Ward and her gospel singers to 1912. It was from 1962.

Because of a copy-editing error, the June 28 “Frame Game” misidentified Rep. Todd Akin as a congressman from Mississippi. He is from Missouri.

In a June 27 "Politics," Siva Vaidhyanathan incorrectly stated that vital polio research was conducted at Case Western Reserve University in the 1950s. The research was conducted at the Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Case Western Reserve University was created in 1967 when Case Institute of Technology and Western Reserve University merged.

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