Slate's Mistakes for the Week of March 26, 2012.

Slate's mistakes.
March 30 2012 6:00 AM

Corrections

Slate's mistakes.

Red pen

Photograph by Gabriela Insuratelu.

In a March 30 “Slatest” post, Ankita Rao misspelled Nicolas Sarkozy's first name. Agence France Presse was also misspelled.

In a March 29 “Bull-e,” Emily Bazelon mistakenly suggested that two depictions of suicide in the documentary Bully were factually questionable. She intended to say that the depiction of Tyler Long’s suicide is factually questionable.

In a March 29 “Faith-Based,” Max Perry Mueller originally misspelled Arun Gandhi’s last name. He also misstated the year of Thomas Jefferson’s first presidential campaign. It was 1800, not 1802.

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In a March 28 "Slatest" post, Abby Ohlheiser misspelled Las Vegas.

In a March 28 “Technology," Farhad Manjoo originally and incorrectly stated that Google’s acquisition of AdMob was investigated by the Department of Justice. The Federal Trade Commission conducted the investigation. The article also originally misspelled the last name of AdMob founder Omar Hamoui.

In the March 27 “Supreme Court Dispatches,” Dahlia Lithwick misspelled Michele Bachmann’s last name.

In a March 26 “Breakingviews” blog post, Jeffrey Goldfarb stated that Lions Gate planned to release three sequels based on Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games trilogy. The studio plans to release two sequels to the initial feature film.

In the March 23 "Explainer,” Brian Palmer misidentified the Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine as the Kirkman College of Osteopathic Medicine.

In a March 23 "Sports Nut," Will Oremus mistakenly referred to "New Hampshire catamounts" in a section about the Vermont Catamounts.

In the March 21 “Politics,” John Dickerson stated that the distance a home run must travel from home plate to centerfield was 400 yards. The distance in most baseball stadiums is roughly 400 feet.

In a Feb. 29 “Technology” column, Farhad Manjoo incorrectly identified Stacey Anderson-Redick as Article One Partners’ top earner. Anderson-Redick is among the company’s top earners; she was highlighted by Article One because her latest winnings put the firm over $2 million in contributions to researchers.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you've seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our comments sections at the bottom of each article.

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