Slate pieces on Day to Day for the week of Sept. 8.

Slate pieces on Day to Day for the week of Sept. 8.

Slate pieces on Day to Day for the week of Sept. 8.

Slate stories on NPR's Day to Day.
Sept. 12 2003 4:32 PM

Slate on NPR's Day to Day

Friday, Sept. 12, 2003

Chatterbox: K Street Blues
Timothy Noah, "Chatterbox" political columnist for Slate, voices his concerns over the new HBO political series K Street, a drama series about a lobbyist firm in Washington, D.C. Listen to the segment.

Commentary: California Recall Accents
Slate writer Eric Liu says the different accents among the field of leading politicians is actually one of the most encouraging things about California's pending recall vote. Listen to the segment.

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Summary Judgment: Cabin Fever, Matchstick Men, Once Upon a Time in Mexico
Mark Jordan Legan has another roundup of reviews of this weekend's newest movies: CabinFever, Matchstick Men, and Once Upon a Time in Mexico. Listen to the segment.

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Thursday, Sept. 11, 2003

Hey, Wait a Minute: 9/11 Myths
Slate's Washington editor, David Plotz, helps separate the rumors from the facts about what really happened during the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Listen to the segment.

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Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2003

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Culturebox: Against Love
Slate senior editor Meghan O'Rourke reviews the new book Against Love. Author Laura Kipnis argues that the institution of marriage is unfair, unworkable, and obsolete.
Listen to the segment.

The Gist: T-Shirts and Mourning
NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates talks with Jen Shreve, an author and essayist who's writing a book about how modern society copes with death. Shreve says the memorial T-shirt—worn across the country after the Sept. 11 tragedy—is beginning to replace traditional black mourning attire.
Listen to the segment.

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Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2003

Jurisprudence: Campaign-Finance Debate
NPR's Alex Chadwick talks with Slate senior editor and legal analyst Dahlia Lithwick about yesterday's Supreme Court hearings that looked at the constitutionality of the McCain-Feingold campaign-finance law. Listen to the segment.

Michael Kinsley: Gay Talese and New Journalism
In 1966, Esquire magazine writer Gay Talese's story "Sinatra Has a Cold" started a revolution in journalism—a new genre of reporting dubbed New Journalism. Nearly two generations later, Slate founding editor Michael Kinsley talks with Talese about the legacy and future of the genre. Listen to the segment.

Webhead: Amnesty From the RIAA
The record industry's main trade group, the Recording Industry Association of America, filed hundreds of lawsuits yesterday against people it claims have been illegally downloading music from the Internet. The group also offered an amnesty to other music downloaders. But Slate technology writer Paul Boutin says the amnesty may have hidden strings attached. Listen to the segment.

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Michael Kinsley: Reviewing Campaign Finance
NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates and Slate founding editor Michael Kinsley discuss issues relating to the McCain-Feingold Campaign Reform Act, which the U.S. Supreme Court is reviewing this week in a special session. Listen to the segment.

Michael Kinsley: Drifting From the Core Values of the GOP?
Slate founding editor Michael Kinsley talks with Joe McQuaid, publisher of the Manchester Union Leader. The conservative New Hampshire newspaper recently printed several editorials critical of what it viewed as the Republican Party's drift from its core values. Listen to the segment.