Vote for Slate's March Audio Book Club selection

Discussing new and classic works.
Feb. 9 2011 10:06 AM

Vote for the March Audio Book Club

Swamplandia!, True Grit, and The Unnamed compete to be Slate's official book of the month.

Attention book-clubbers: It's time to cast your votes for the novel we'll be discussing on the Slate Audio Book Club in March (to be broadcast on Monday, Mar. 28). We received many suggestions from listeners, and the episode's panelists—Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and Hanna Rosin—have narrowed the list down to three nominees:

Swamplandia!by Karen Russell. This debut novel, set in a struggling Florida tourist attraction, tells the story of Ava Bigtree, a young alligator wrestler who embarks on an odyssey to save her family. A rave in the New York Times Book Review calls it a "wild ride."

Andy Bowers Andy Bowers

Andy Bowers is the executive producer of Slate’s podcasts. Follow him on Twitter.

True Gritby Charles Portis. The inspiration for two critically hailed film versions (the new one by the Coen Brothers received 10 Oscar nominations), Charles Portis's 1968 novel is itself a classic, a powerful western with a strong comedic bent.

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The Unnamedby Joshua Ferris. Ferris' second novel tells of a rich, successful couple brought to the brink of ruin by the husband's mysterious ailment—a compulsion to walk for hours until he collapses with exhaustion. Slate editor David Plotz's choice for book of the year in 2010.

You can cast your vote below between now and Friday, Feb. 11 at 9 p.m. ET.

Two other reminders: On Monday, Feb. 28, we'll be discussing Room, by Emma Donoghue, so start reading if you haven't yet.

And the January book club podcast, the definitive discussion of Amy Chua's Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, is posted and available for listening/downloading here.

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