Jimi Hendrix’s Voodoo Child and Janis Joplin’s Ball and Chain.

Pop, Race, and the ’60s on Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin

Pop, Race, and the ’60s on Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin

A Slate Academy
Nov. 4 2016 7:00 AM

“Voodoo Child (Slight Return)” and “Ball and Chain”

Why Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin don’t fit into the standard narrative of the ’60s.

Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin
Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin

Promotional photo of The Jimi Hendrix Experience. Publicity photo from photo session of Janis Joplin.

In this episode of our Slate Academy Pop, Race, and the ’60s, Slate pop critic Jack Hamilton talks to Ann Powers, critic and correspondent for NPR Music and a former critic for the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and Blender, about Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin: the only black artist regularly featured on classic rock radio, and one of the only women in the boys’ club of ’60s rock. How do these two virtuosos complicate the standard narrative of the rock revolution?

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