"Help Japan" T-shirts and posters: Can good design help the beleaguered country?

Arts, entertainment, and more.
March 22 2011 7:14 AM

You Say You're Concerned About Japan

Do you have the T-shirt to prove it?

Click here to see a slide show of T-shirts, posters, and prints designed to raise money for Japan relief efforts.

Of course you're concerned about the well-being of the Japanese people in the wake of the earthquake, tsunami, and still-unfolding nuclear crisis. But do you have the tastefully designed products to prove it?

It's an ugly question, sure, but one that's becoming hard to avoid, given the onslaught of help-Japan posters, T-shirts, and so on and so on, popping up all over the Web. Even Threadless, the T-shirt company famous for its crowdsourced designs, got into the creativity-for-a-cause market by way of a contest offering $500, a gift certificate, and the promise that the winning design would "help Japan rise from the rubble." In short, we're seeing enough examples of this emergent genre of concern-expression to fill a small gallery—or rather, a boutique.

And what's wrong with that? Well, whenever charitable effort manifests itself in the marketplace, it makes people uneasy or, in the case of Microsoft's tweet-about-Japan campaign, upset. Do we need a trendy object to signal that we've acted on our concern? Should empathy really be channeled through our taste in design? Does this design surge suggest that "helping Japan" is merely some kind of meme to get in on, before the next thing to hit the cool-product blogs makes it passé? Is there a connection, or a tension, between doing good and selling good stuff?

Advertisement

First, let's consider the stuff. The central visual motif that help-Japan designers have glommed onto is the famous red sun symbol from the country's flag. A print by W+K Studio (connected to famous ad agency Wieden + Kennedy) mixes the red disc with the similarly iconic Red Cross plus sign, reversed out in white. (It's offered in exchange for a $25 donation or more, which the studio says it will pass along to the American Red Cross.) Another design, from Zac Neulieb Prints, puts the red sun on a black background and overlays a seismograph pattern. (This goes for $22.50, proceeds going, again, to the American Red Cross.) Posters by Halifax-based designer James White show the disc cracked, hovering over the words "Help Japan." (They're $29.99; he's giving money to the Canadian Red Cross.) A notable entry in the Threadless contest depicts the sun symbol marred by a kind of crater.

Each of these efforts is impressive in its way, though I doubt any of them will be lasting artifacts. Then again, I don't think they were really intended to be. Recontextualizing a familiar icon with a visual tweak referencing current events is an approach that aims very specifically to communicate urgency: Act now, not later. Some of these images would be solid magazine covers, for instance.

Not everybody has turned to the sun symbol. This $20 Salvation Army T-shirt by a designer calling himself Hydro74 puts Japanese characters across an intricately embellished version of the organization's famous shield logo; it's translated, somewhat weirdly, as "Save World Army," according to the online store listing. (Side note: I was previously unaware that the Salvation Army sells a variety of T's featuring Hot Topic-style remixes of its branding.) One of the $25 T-shirts sold by band Linkin Park, designed by guitarist and vocalist Mike Shinoda, features an origami butterfly. The many Threadless entries included visuals ranging from giant robots to bandaged hearts.

TODAY IN SLATE

Medical Examiner

The Most Terrifying Thing About Ebola 

The disease threatens humanity by preying on humanity.

I Bought the Huge iPhone. I’m Already Thinking of Returning It.

Scotland Is Just the Beginning. Expect More Political Earthquakes in Europe.

Students Aren’t Going to College Football Games as Much Anymore

And schools are getting worried.

Global Marches Demand Action on Climate Change

Politics

Blacks Don’t Have a Corporal Punishment Problem

Americans do. But when blacks exhibit the same behaviors as others, it becomes part of a greater black pathology. 

Why a Sketch of Chelsea Manning Is Stirring Up Controversy

How Worried Should Poland, the Baltic States, and Georgia Be About a Russian Invasion?

Moneybox
Sept. 19 2014 1:11 PM Americans' Inexplicable Aversion to the 1990s
  News & Politics
Weigel
Sept. 20 2014 11:13 AM -30-
  Business
Business Insider
Sept. 20 2014 6:30 AM The Man Making Bill Gates Richer
  Life
Quora
Sept. 20 2014 7:27 AM How Do Plants Grow Aboard the International Space Station?
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 19 2014 4:58 PM Steubenville Gets the Lifetime Treatment (And a Cheerleader Erupts Into Flames)
  Slate Plus
Tv Club
Sept. 21 2014 1:15 PM The Slate Doctor Who Podcast: Episode 5  A spoiler-filled discussion of "Time Heist."
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 21 2014 2:00 PM Colin Farrell Will Star in True Detective’s Second Season
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 19 2014 6:31 PM The One Big Problem With the Enormous New iPhone
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Sept. 21 2014 8:00 AM An Astronaut’s Guided Video Tour of Earth
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 18 2014 11:42 AM Grandmaster Clash One of the most amazing feats in chess history just happened, and no one noticed.